Interesting Links

Below I share interesting links to stories that I find interesting. Topics cover technology, politics, society, culture, economics, and others. I may not always endorse opinions expressed in them.

Seven secrets to lasting career satisfaction

  • Values. What do I like to do? What brings out my best?
  • Vision. How do I want to grow? What do I want to create for myself?
  • Competency. What do I bring to the table? What value do I have, and how should this grow over time? What do I need to get to the next level?
  • Relationships. Who’s supporting me? Who’s in my posse? Who gives me resilience and validation? And who can I learn from?

Executive Coach. I recently changed my job and subconsciously asked myself these questions before I did.

Far from her homeland, my mother finds comfort at a Patel Brothers grocery store

Patel Brothers never asks her to be anyone except who she is. The store carries no meat, meaning my mom can breathe deeply. Every aisle is open to her. Conversations with staff can take place in an easy blend of English and Gujarati or Hindi, her now preferred method of conversation. It’s possible to say, “Where is the jeeru?” and get an answer. At Whole Foods, she must remember to ask for cumin.

The Washington Post. A true ‘crossing borders crossing cultures’ story that’s evocative of every immigrant’s experience even after they’ve been here for a long time.

Suicides among Veterinarians

Another key driver of this suicide crisis: Veterinarians are consistently asked to act as animal undertakers. Euthanizing their clients can cause what a recent study referred to as ethical conflict and moral distress, which arises when vets are forced to put aside their expert opinions and accept pet owners’ decisions about if and when to put their animals down. More so, this proximity to death makes dying seem like a reasonable way to ease suffering.

The Washington Post.

This is a harrowing and sad read. One of the causes is also the disparity between vet school tuition and potential earnings.

Millennials Don’t Have a Monopoly on Burnout

According to research psychologists, burnout has three dimensions: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization (or cynicism), and the feeling of personal inefficacy. To measure it, they administer a questionnaire called the Maslach Burnout Inventory, named for Christina Maslach, a leading burnout researcher for four decades.

Maslach and her coauthor, Michael Leiter, identify six main causes of burnout that arise within organizations: too much work, lack of control, too little reward, unfairness, conflicting values, and the breakdown of community. If you experience these in your job for long enough, you’re likely to go home every day feeling empty, bitter, and useless.

The New Republic.

The Death of the Sick Day

“We call them personal emergency days,” Mr. Marsen said.

Broadening the definition gives employees greater privacy, Mr. Marsen said. It also takes into consideration mental health and whether a child or another family member who depends on the employee is sick and requires care.

No longer does the employee have to “sell” their sickness to their boss with a list of symptoms.

The New York Times.