Suicides among Veterinarians

Another key driver of this suicide crisis: Veterinarians are consistently asked to act as animal undertakers. Euthanizing their clients can cause what a recent study referred to as ethical conflict and moral distress, which arises when vets are forced to put aside their expert opinions and accept pet owners’ decisions about if and when to put their animals down. More so, this proximity to death makes dying seem like a reasonable way to ease suffering.

The Washington Post.

This is a harrowing and sad read. One of the causes is also the disparity between vet school tuition and potential earnings.

Millennials Don’t Have a Monopoly on Burnout

According to research psychologists, burnout has three dimensions: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization (or cynicism), and the feeling of personal inefficacy. To measure it, they administer a questionnaire called the Maslach Burnout Inventory, named for Christina Maslach, a leading burnout researcher for four decades.

Maslach and her coauthor, Michael Leiter, identify six main causes of burnout that arise within organizations: too much work, lack of control, too little reward, unfairness, conflicting values, and the breakdown of community. If you experience these in your job for long enough, you’re likely to go home every day feeling empty, bitter, and useless.

The New Republic.

The Death of the Sick Day

“We call them personal emergency days,” Mr. Marsen said.

Broadening the definition gives employees greater privacy, Mr. Marsen said. It also takes into consideration mental health and whether a child or another family member who depends on the employee is sick and requires care.

No longer does the employee have to “sell” their sickness to their boss with a list of symptoms.

The New York Times.

Interesting Links

Below I share interesting links to stories that I find interesting. Topics cover technology, politics, society, culture, economics, and others. I may not always endorse opinions expressed in them.

How Fair Is American Society?

“For every $100 earned by an average white family, how much do you think was earned by an average black family in 2013?” The average respondent guessed $85.59, meaning they thought black families make $14.41 less than average white families. The real answer, based on the Current Population Survey, was $57.30, a gap of $42.70. Study participants were off by almost 30 points.

The gap between estimate and reality was largest for a question about household wealth. Participants guessed that the difference between white and black households would be about $100 to $85, when in reality it’s $100 to $5. In other words, study participants were off by almost 80 points.

Yale Insights.

What happened to U.S. economy since end of WWII?

That’s a lot to unpack in 5,000 words, but the short story of what happened over the last 73 years is simple: Things were very uncertain, then they were very good, then pretty bad, then really good, then really bad, and now here we are. And there is, I think, a narrative that links all those events together. Not a detailed account. But a story of how the details fit together.

How this all happened.

Exploring the Oregon Coast

Barring the Outer Banks, I’ve explored the eastern seaboard from Acadia National Park to Key West so now we’ve turned our attention westward. We’ve done the drive from San Francisco to Big Sur, hiked Yosemite Valley and Death Valley so, over the summer, we ventured north and visited the Oregon Coast. Here are some recommendations (I borrowed Sameer Vasta’s travelogue format).

Continue reading “Exploring the Oregon Coast”

Switching to Solar Energy

Should you install solar panels if you’re living in Texas? The short answer​ is – it depends. For us, after doing our due diligence, we decided to go for it and​ at the end of the hottest month of the year (June-July 2018), we generated the following output:

Solar Production in June-July 2018

Continue reading if you too are interested in going solar and saving not only on your electric bill but also earning karma points from the environment.

Continue reading “Switching to Solar Energy”

Measuring College-Going Outcomes

The grant that I work on currently, GEAR UP, uses college enrollment as its primary outcome. Or rather it used to. In recent grant cycles, the shift in absolute priorities has​ indicated that primary outcomes have been moving toward persistence i.e. staying in college for eventual graduation. In measuring college-going outcomes, it can vary with increasing expectations:

  1. Enrolling in any postsecondary institution
  2. Enrolling in a 2-year college
  3. Enrolling in a 4-year college
  4. Enrolling in college without need for remediation
  5. Persisting in college for the second year on track to graduation
  6. Graduating from college in six years

GEAR UP, due to its nature of the grant cycle, can only measure the first five outcomes and predict with varying accuracy the sixth one. But it is increasingly obvious that the first two outcomes are met easily or even the third outcome but the other two are exponentially difficult.

Continue reading “Measuring College-Going Outcomes”